Sunday, March 26, 2006

FIGS Do A Body Good


These are dried adriatic figs, the kind most often used to make fig bars. I picked up a bag of these dried fruits Wednesday at my favorite little Amish store. I was a little shocked that they cost $6.38 / lb, but after trying one I realized eating the while fig was just like having a fig newton cookie - yummy! I'm all for eating the whole food when I can.

When I searched to find the nutritional information I discovered that the chances of me getting to fresh fruit is slim because they only are good for about 1 week, so 90% of he fig crop is dried and are available year round. Things to consider when buying dried figs:

  • Check for unbroken wrapping; the figs should give slightly when gently squeezed through the package. Watch out for moldy or sour-smelling dried figs

  • Dried figs can be stored at cool room temperature or in the refrigerator and will keep for several months; just be sure that they are well wrapped after opening so that they do not become too dry and hard.

  • They can also be frozen, then thawed at room temperature.

Here's some facts about the fig:

Dried Figs/4 medium

Calories 194, Total fat (g) 0.9, Dietary fiber (g) 9.3, Protein (g) 2, Carbohydrate (g) 50

I got my information from the website of Whole Health MD

http://www.wholehealthmd.com/refshelf/foods_view/1,1523,51,00.html

BEFORE YOU GO FIG WILD realize that a little of a good thing is often the best. Figs are among a small number of foods that contain any measurable amount of oxalates, when concentrated in the body they can cause health problems or may also interfere with absorption of calcium from the body.

This info came from the webpage of The World's Healthiest Foods

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=24

7 comments:

Michelle said...

"they only are good for about 1 week, so 90% of he fig crop is dried and are available year round."

"when concentrated in the body they can cause health problems or may also interfere with absorption of calcium from the body."

Thanks for this information. I had no idea! I have never had a fresh fig and my neighbor has a tree. I think I'll try one. :)

Brenda W. said...

A co-worker took a vacation to Egypt where she had fresh figs, and said they were the most divine things she'd ever tried. Once back home, she will occasionally pick up some fig jam, which you can sometimes find in specialty stores, and she says that reminds her alot of the fresh figs.

Dori said...

Michelle - I have never had a fresh fig either. They seem to be a popular "food of the gods" thorughout ancient and medieval history, I got them for home school purposes but am glad I did - yummy. Wish I could try one of your neighbors figs too. ;-)

Brenda - yum fig jelly! Thanks for visiting my blog.

Michelle said...

My neighbor's figs are not ready yet. I'll have to ask when they are. I have had fig jelly just once and all I could taste was the white sugar. It wasn't very good. There must be different ways to make it.

Dori said...

I've never had fig jelly. Figs are so incredibly sweet I couldn't imagine wanting sugar.... I could imagine rehydrating them and puree in the blender for a spread if needed. Actually I have just been eating the dried ones just like they are, mine are soft... it's a very sweet treat. If they were hard and dry then maybe the rehydated spread.

Michelle said...

I hadn't thought of drying figs. My book says to dry them for 10 to 12 hours, sliced in quarters, fairly hard but chewable. Use reconstitued figs in cookies, pie or cakes. Yum. I am going to have to try this. We are going on a trip, so dried figs as a snack sound good. :) Thanks for bring this up.

Spice Island Vegan said...

Dori,

Thanks for the info about figs. I had it cut up in my oatmeal or cereals. It is yummy!

Debbie